Well. I haven’t written in a month of Sundays.

Okay, really just a month of regular days.

Or, well, really just almost a month of regular days. Or almost regular days.

Because really, are any of these current days really just regular days?

At any rate, my first idea for this post was to tell you all about the woodpecker that’s finally moved back in.

The woods in back of my house have been way too quiet for way too long, but finally…finally…he (or she) is back, drumming his (or her) percussive melody on the pines and oaks and maples and other trees whose names I never really bothered to learn.

I adore this. I may write about this one day soon.

But not today.

Today I’m compelled to write about what Paul had to say. About not doing things.

Because – did I mention? – I haven’t written in a month of Sundays.

Or almost.

At any rate, a really long time.

I do have an excuse. I mean, don’t we all sort of always have an excuse? Human nature, I suppose.

When you don’t do that thing that you really want to do, or maybe just think you want to do, or maybe just think that you should do, or maybe even made a resolution to do just a few short days ago…but then…

…you just don’t do it.

Paul knew it. Although I think he was speaking of something a bit more important than the writing of a blog post.

Still, he knew.

“I do not understand my own actions. For I do not do what I want…”

I think Paul may have been speaking about things a bit weightier than a blog post. But still.

He got me thinking. Actually, he always gets me thinking.

Which I both adore, and am annoyed by.

I adore it because who in the world wouldn’t be thrilled with thoughts that challenge you to be your best self? Words that make you look at your days and your challenges and your faith and examine them? Maybe even improve them?

But I’m also annoyed because who in the world wants to be challenged, even if it is to be your best self? Who wants to read words that make you look at your days and your lack of rising to the occasion and examine your utter lack of motivation to write or to put away the laundry or to even, frankly, care about improving anything in the middle of a pandemic?

But that is just exactly what I’m sort of thinking we must do.“Our essential purpose is to become the best version of ourselves.” (~Matthew Kelly)

Rise to the occasion.

Look at our days and our challenges and our faiths and examine them. And improve them.

And yes, strive – even in the midst of a pandemic – to be our best selves.

And so, I am writing.

~xo,
LuAnne


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“Our essential purpose is to become the best version of ourselves.” (~Matthew Kelly)

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